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    • "Foreplay"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 28, 2003 - January 10, 2004

      Ellen Cantor, Gelatin, Candida Hofer, Oliver Lanz, Nate Lowman, Alex McQuilkin, Pierre Molinier, Moriceau + Mryzyk, Florian Pumhosl, Daniel Richter, Ugo Rondinone, Wolfgang Tilmans, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tobias Z. (Gert and Uwe Tobias)
    • "Foreplay"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 28, 2003 - January 10, 2004


      History of the SUV/No Blond Jokes, 2003
      Installation of synthetic polymer paint, bumper stickers, and pencil on canvas, printed paper, and ink transfer on canvas
      Dimensions variable
    • "2003 Summer Program"
      Organized by Katy Siegel, Mitchell Algus, Michele Maccarone
      Apexart, NYC
      June 15 - July 26, 2003

      John Dogg, Kaz Oshiro, Robert Cuoghi, Nate Lowman

      Michele Maccarone on Robert Cuoghi and Nate Lowman

      
Robert Cuoghi's art practice addresses cultural and social estrangement. In his self-imposed outsider position, Cuoghi's marginalization is extreme. He grew his fingernails into elongated spirals that negated his ability to function normally. He wore glasses that inverted everything he saw, rendering him unable to make sense of the visual world. He gained weight, dyed his hair white and dressed in his father's clothes; even more, he studied his father and learned his gestures and habits in order to take on this new persona. This performance became a daily practice, a living sculpture with no commodified art product except for some scant documentation, such as the odd photo. It exists primarily as a story passed by word of mouth. Cuoghi claims no space with his performances. He demands nothing of his audience as he proceeds with his artwork alone every moment of every day, prematurely aged, uncomfortably overweight—an extreme endurance test.

      During this period, Cuoghi made Goodgriefies, an animated video. At the very beginning of the video, he appears as a pastische of himself and his father, as an old man in a grey suit wearing round spectacles. The video itself explores the complications of generational identity and relationship through the medium of familiar cartoon characters. Characters appropriated from Loony Tunes, Scooby Doo, The Flinstones, and Peanuts are montaged and combined with those from more contemporary series such as The Simpsons, Beavis and Butthead, and South Park. Just as Cuoghi has intensified his genetic relationship to his father by collapsing the temporal space between them, Goodgriefies takes figures like Charlie Brown and Bart Simpson, one the child of the other, and forces them to co-exist as peers, at the same moment in time.

      The father also plays a central role in the work of Nate Lowman. Inspired by his own father, who wears a beard, Lowman has been collecting images of men masked by facial hair: Jim Morrison, Jerry Garcia, Tom Cruise, John Walker Lindh, and Ted Kaczynski, among others. He fastidiously collages, appropriates, paints, photographs, and arranges these found and created images in a constantly growing and fluctuating project. The giant wall installation is heavily loaded with social and generational iconography of madness, rebellion, politics, and violence. Lowman himself is a second—or is it third? fourth?—generation appropriation artist, building on the work of artists like Andy Warhol, Richard Prince, and Chivas Clem that take media images and re-evaluate them.

      Michele Maccarone 
© June 2003
    • "2003 Summer Program"
      Organized by Katy Siegel, Mitchell Algus, Michele Maccarone
      Apexart, NYC
      June 15 - July 26, 2003

      John Dogg, Kaz Oshiro, Robert Cuoghi, Nate Lowman
    • "2003 Summer Program"
      Organized by Katy Siegel, Mitchell Algus, Michele Maccarone
      Apexart, NYC
      June 15 - July 26, 2003

      John Dogg, Kaz Oshiro, Robert Cuoghi, Nate Lowman

    • "2003 Summer Program"
      Organized by Katy Siegel, Mitchell Algus, Michele Maccarone
      Apexart, NYC
      June 15 - July 26, 2003

      John Dogg, Kaz Oshiro, Robert Cuoghi, Nate Lowman
    • "A Matter of Facts"
      Curated by Clarissa Dalrymple
      Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, New York
      September 6 - October 4, 2003

      Beverly Buchanan, Andrew Lord, Nate Lowman, Adam McEwen, Nick Nehez, Glexis Novoa, Hirsch Perlman, Banks Violette

      Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery is pleased to present A Matter of Facts, an exhibition of sculpture, drawings, photographs and video by eight artists selected by Clarissa Dalrymple. Hailing from Miami, Los Angeles, and New York this diverse group of artists use a wide variety of materials and techniques to create complex narratives that ironically retain an uncomplicated, do-it-yourself sensibility.

      Beverly Buchanan constructs “shacks” out of leftover wood and tin capturing a metaphysical portrait of their rural Southern residents. More than the ramshackle dwellings that they appear to be, these sculpture represent the endurable human spirit of their occupants. Constantly reminding the viewer of the innate human ability to create.

      Andrew Lord has long explored the cultural and historic connotations of the vase, breaking down distinctions between the functional and the aesthetic. The two works exhibited here record the movements and gestures intrinsic to their creation. From a series of seven built between 1993 and 2000 entitled biting, tasting, watching, breathing, listening, smelling and swallowing we show the three part work smelling here. Dated 1996, the artist constructs this work using the space between his hands, nose and nostrils. Using his body as a tool for building has enabled Lord to identify and isolate senses and sensations and build a catalogue of his physical self.

      This body of work was concluded in 2000 with a related series entitled Open Book and Closed Book. The second work displayed here Open book. Nine pieces. Modelling. dates from 1999-2000.

      Nate Lowman fastidiously collages, appropriates, paints, photographs, and arranges found and created images in a constantly growing and fluctuating project. Preferring to work with wall installations, the images address the social and generational iconography of madness, rebellion, politics, and violence. Lowman builds on the work of artists like Andy Warhol, and Richard Prince, which take media images and re-evaluate them.

      Adam McEwen's paintings and drawings of ironic signage subtlety refer to a wide range of influences such as Warhol’s hand-made paintings of the early 60’s to user-friendly advertising design. Their sometimes-aggressive messages, however, always cause the viewer to re-asses what would normally seem like background banality.

      Nick Nehez's video, Paper/Movie is a two-channel video analysis of The New York Times front page. One channel is comprised of one year of front- page photos projected in chronological order. The other video channel consists of 356 pictures of alloy wheels taken from a car-parts catalogue. The soundtrack music is culled from various horror, western, slapstick comedy, and romance/drama Hollywood films. Its conclusions about newspapers, capitalism, photography or filmmaking are tongue-in-cheek, and ultimately suggest the frustration of confronting an absurd system that defies reform, and repeats with no end in sight.

      Glexis Novoa is a Miami-based Cuban artist whose graphite on rose marble fragments depict futuristic cityscapes where overbuilt urban mirages teeter on thin islands as if viewed from a distance across water. The permanence of the artists work references art, architecture and humanity, while his confident and fluid marks utilize striations in the marble as compositional points of departure.

      Hirsch Perlman's black and white photographs take advantage of a lengthy exposure to allow for the drawing of images with light. Taken on his rooftop in Los Angles, Perlman composes child-like doodles of rocket ships and astronauts.

      Banks Violette uses iconography of heavy metal music subcultures as a language with which to investigate the human emotions of despair and longing. His obsessively crafted installations, beg us to question how these empty symbols of death and evil can actually instigate destruction. In his show at Team in 2002, the artist metaphorically recreated the true story of a young girl in California who was killed by three of her classmates as a sacrifice to Satan in the hopes of gaining a prosperous music career.
    • "A Matter of Facts"
      Curated by Clarissa Dalrymple
      Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, New York
      September 6 - October 4, 2003

      Left:
      Untitled (Nicole), 2003
      Xerox, 30 1/4 x 18 inches

      Center:
      Roc La Familia, 2001
      Mixed media on offset litho, 30 1/4 x 40 1/2 inches

      Right:
      Untitled (Frankie), 2003
      Acrylic on linen, 48 x 28 inches
    • "A Matter of Facts"
      Curated by Clarissa Dalrymple
      Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, New York
      September 6 - October 4, 2003

      Above, left:
      Bonnie and Clyde '02, 2002
      Acrylic on canvas
      60 x 23 inches

      Above, right:
      This is History Baby, 2003
      Xerox, edition of 20
      17 x 10 1/2 inches

      Below:
      Why Aren't There Any K-Marts in Iraq? Too Many Targets (For Wayne Gonzales), 2003
      Acrylic on canvas
      17 1/2 x 24 inches