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    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Ritter/Zamet is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in the UK of New York artist, Nate Lowman.  

      Since participating in the No Platform Just a Trampoline exhibition at the Marcus Ritter gallery and subsequently being selected by Michele Maccarone for the Apexart Summer Program in New York in 2003, Nate Lowman's work has been included in group exhibitions around the US at venues including Gavin Brown's Enterprise, Grant Selwyn Fine Art and David Zwirner Gallery. Earlier this year he both curated and participated in the exhibition Let the Bullshit Run a Marathon, at Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, New York and he was also included in the recent exhibition, The Mythological Machine at the Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre in Coventry curated by Francesco Manacorda. Nate Lowman was also featured in Artforum's First Take (January 2004) as one of the artists to watch during the year ahead.  

      Nate Lowman's practice is based on an avid research into images that are then layered and recombined to create an intoxicating effect. By employing an endless variety of two-dimensional media to create subtle and allusive compositions on the wall surface, he elaborates and connects visual materials in order to foreground hidden narratives and identificatory systems that circulate in images in the public domain.

      The visual material that he reworks are often well-known icons sedimented in our collective memory, the image repertoire that newspapers, television and the Internet force inside our imagination every day. In such a framework, media pictures can easily take on the roles of idols, and it is precisely this transformative process that catches Lowman's attention. His "wall collages" merge the taxonomic impulse to collect consistent material with a pleasure in visual metonymies. If at first glance the connections between the pictures might seem to be a rhetorical device, closer inspection reveals a peculiarly fluctuating emotional mechanism that consolidates the visuals produced and edited by the media.

      In London, Lowman will show his recently completed wall piece This Career Idea, a meditation on the obscure flipside of young hero's fame. Inasmuch as we invest our emotive charge in them as positive models for the ego, a perverse reversion happens when they fall into disgrace, and a negative, perhaps more dangerous identification takes place. The work equates, among many, the image of McCauley Culkin, recently arrested on drug charges, a Xerox image of Mark Thatcher with his all-women racing team, and a painting of Olivier North. A kaleidoscopic effect is obtained through a subtle web of associative links depicted through many different formats and media. In the painting Höhere Wesen befahlen, the artist references Sigmar Polke's famous painting while addressing the recent US censorship of war images. Lowman has painted in the upper right corner of the canvas one of the infamously concealed images of American soldiers' coffins wrapped in the Stars and Stripes flag.

      Text by Francesco Manacorda
                                         
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Human Traffic, South America a.k.a. The Last Supper for Art & Language, 2004
      Print on satin flag
      57 x 96 inches
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Everybody Makes Mistakes, 2004
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Höhere Wesen befahlen, 2004
      Alkyd on canvas
      59.8 x 59.8 cm
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Untitled (J.P.W.L.), 2004
      Enamel and gesso on canvas
      15.7 x 15.7 inches
    • "Re: Re: Re: Produce"
      Ritter/Zamet, London
      November 6 - December 18, 2004

      Paper Airplane, 2004
      Alkyd on canvas
      36 x 30 inches
    • "Happy Days Are Here Again"
      Curated by André Schlechtriem
      David Zwirner, New York
      June 25 - July 31, 2004

      Carla Arocha, Hernan Bas, Marc Brandenburg, Ernesto Caivano, Chivas Clem, Michael Cline, Martin Eder, Keith Farquhar, Christian Flamm, Evan Gruzis, Christian Holstad, Violet Hopkins, Sergej Jensen, David Korty, Nate Lowman, Rosa Loy, Marco Maggi, Yuri Masnyj, Nick Mauss, Adam McEwen, Birgit Megerle, Paul P., Tyson Reeder, Peter Stauss, Nicolau Vergueiro, Amelie von Wulffen, Ralf Ziervogel

      David Zwirner is pleased to present the group exhibition Happy Days are Here Again,curated by André Schlechtriem. As curator of the Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection, Mr. Schlechtriem surveyed the work of more than 1000 contemporary artists in the United States and abroad over the last year. This exhibition represents an international selection of mostly younger contemporary artists, many of which have never shown in New York. Alternately, some artists have been included in more established contemporary art surveys: Ernesto Caivano, Christian Holstad, and Hernan Bas were included in the 2004 Whitney Biennial; Amelie von Wulffen exhibited in the 2003 Venice Biennial, the 2004 Berlin Biennale, and is currently included in Manifesta 5.

      The title for the exhibition is derived from an unabashedly utopian campaign song for Theodore Roosevelt’s 1932 presidential race, composed in 1929 by Jack Yellin and Milton Ager. Contrary to the sentimentality expressed within the original song lyrics, many of the artists in the exhibition have created work that is in reaction to the current, darker days; with an on-going war in Iraq, international fears of terrorism, global environmental crises, and perennial injustice within third world countries, many younger artists have returned to a more figurative neo-romanticism to express their idiosyncratic view of the world. Sometimes dark and sometimes self-consciously oblivious, the work in this show represents how younger artists are attempting to come to terms with the challenges characteristic of the young 21st century. At the same time, this exhibition represents a selection from a new generation of artists, one that provides hope and promise for what is to come. While the work may be a symptom of a troubled world, its mere existence brings a sense of optimism that a new generation is aware.

      Happy Days are Here Again exists in a series of other group exhibitions held at David Zwirner in the past: Sampler (1994); Someone else with my Fingerprints (1997); Conceptual Photography from the 1960s and 1970s (1998); Video library (1998); I Love New York (2001); New York ca. 1975 (summer 2001); and Bright Lights, Big City (2004). With its investigation of a younger generation of art, Happy Days are Here Again brings the historical progression of group shows at David Zwirner up to the contemporary day. While New York ca. 1975 grouped together artists working with diverse media in the 1970s, and Bright Lights, Big City examined trends in contemporary art during the 1980s, Happy Days looks to the new generation of artists, and proposes what we are to expect in the future.
    • "Happy Days Are Here Again"
      Curated by André Schlechtriem
      David Zwirner, New York
      June 25 - July 31, 2004

      One More Service, 2004
      Latex, Bumper stickers on poster mounted on foamcore
      47 1/2 x 27 1/4 x 1/4 inches
    • "Power, Corruption and Lies"
      Curated by Adam McEwan and Neville Wakefield
      Roth Horowitz, NYC
      June 23 – July 23, 2004

      Lutz Bacher, Chris Burden, Jeremy Deller, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Jonah Freeman, Robert Gober, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Phillip Guston, Richard Hamilton, Aleksandra Mir, Bruce Nauman, Cady Noland, Richard Phillips, Richard Prince, David Rees, Ed Ruscha, Rudolph Stingel, Andy Warhol, Garry Winogrand, David Wojnarowicz, Christopher Wool, and others

      Taking its cue from New Order’s 1983 album of the same name, Power, Corruption and Lies gathers together in a small room some work that gazes out across the landscape of Western capitalism and registers what it finds there: the septic tanks and sewers that irrigate our deepest fears and anxieties. These are the artifacts of a society for which public outcome is brokered on the john of private agreement, and distrust is basted in the sunny opportunities of the fitful Dream.

      It is a landscape that reflects overtly political contradictions, seen in pieces such as Andy Warhol’s Vote McGovern poster, depicting a leering, green-faced Richard Nixon, or Robert Gober’s immaculately faked newspaper stacks, or Richard Phillips’s portrait of George W Bush. Or it might echo the relationship between the individual and power: Chris Burden’s photograph of himself firing a pistol at an airliner, Felix Gonzales-Torres’s puzzles, Cady Noland’s images of Lee Harvey Oswald and Patty Hearst. Or, it might assume a more oblique stance in relation to power and the location of “truth”, seen in prints by Bruce Nauman, Richard Prince and Ed Ruscha.

      The smell of putrefaction that tends to curl around the shoulders of power is not, of course, a phenomenon peculiar to the early 21st century. Still, the scent is strong right now. In the current circumstances, it seems a not inappropriate moment to consult the work of some artists who have inhaled deeply.

      Curated by Adam McEwen and Neville Wakefield.
    • "Power, Corruption and Lies"
      Curated by Adam McEwan and Neville Wakefield
      Roth Horowitz, NYC
      June 23 – July 23, 2004